2014
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: February 2014

Oticon Foundation
2005
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Sign of the times

Wilton resident David McKee, who has been profoundly deaf by birth, is excited by the prospect of New Zealand sign language becoming the country's third official language saying it would legitimise his mother tongue and acknowledge the fact that deaf community has its own language and culture.
2007
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Deaf people being left on the outer

A shortage of sign language interpreters means as many as 7700 deaf people are struggling to access services in their communities.
1987
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: April 1987 (Vol. 1, No. 1)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1990
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: March 1990 (Vol. 4, No. 1)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1999
video – Taonga source: Rodney Roberts

Rodney’s Deaf Saturday

Rodney Roberts takes us through the typical Saturday of a Deaf Wellingtonian, with the Manawatu Deaf boys playing a game of rugby (and being well beaten 47 to 7), before taking us on a tour through a Wellington Deaf Society event to farewell an international interpreter.
Rodney Roberts
1990
publication – Taonga source: New Zealand Deaf News

NZ Deaf News: Autumn/Winter 1990 (Vol. 24, No. 1)

1993
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

Sounds or Silence?

In the early 1990s, due to a breakthrough in technology, cochlear implants were starting to become the norm. The Deaf community worldwide viewed cochlear implants as a device that disregarded the need for access to sign language. Others considered such devices a miracle. In 1993, ‘60 Minutes’ investigated this controversial topic in New Zealand.
Television New Zealand Archive
1990-91
publication – Taonga source: New Zealand Deaf News

NZ Deaf News: Spring/Summer 1990/91 (Vol. 24. No. 2)

1994
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

A Deafening Silence

A ‘Frontline’ documentary that touches upon an on-going topic - Deaf Education - in the Deaf community, not only in New Zealand but worldwide as well. In 2019, the message remains as familiar as it was twenty-five years ago.
Television New Zealand Archive
1994
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: October 1994

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1997
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: Summer 1997

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
2002
article – Taonga source: The Evening Post

In full voice

This fascinating book provides insight into a community about which most people are unaware. This is the world of Deaf culture, of Deaf as an identity, not a disability or deficit – Deaf with a capital D.
2014
article – Taonga source: The Dominion

Fewer Kiwis can use sign language

James Whale can speak as well as any 5-year old but sometimes he lets his hand do the talking. The Wellington boy and his family are among the dwindling number of Kiwis who can use NZSL.
2011
video – Taonga source: Deaf Aotearoa New Zealand

God Defend New Zealand: New Zealand National Anthem in NZSL, Maori & English

In NZSL with subtitles in Māori and English; created in collaboration with native speakers of NZSL, Māori & English, and sign language linguists from the Deaf community, with the purpose to create a NZSL translation that was true to the meaning behind the Māori & English lyrics.
Deaf Aotearoa New Zealand
2009
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: September 2009

Oticon Foundation
1986
article – Taonga source: NZPA

Communing In Silence

Deaf people gatherered near the front of the papal Mass as interpreter Rachel Locker translated for them. She said it was one of the hardest job she had done because of the religious language.
1995
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald

Signs from the silent world

Deaf students have the right to equal access to tertiary education but who will pay for sign language interpreters?
1999
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: Winter 1999

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1985
video – Taonga source: Victoria University of Wellington

First interpreting course graduation – 1985

The Sign Language Interpreting course graduation ceremony September 1985, after 14 weeks training.
Victoria University of Wellington
1987
video – Taonga source: Deaf Society of Canterbury

Athletics at the 32nd Annual NZ Games for the Deaf: Christchurch 1987

The popular athletics interclub and open championship ran to a tight program, from 8:00am to 12:00 noon. The Oxspring Shield for interclub athletics went to Auckland with 32 points. The 32nd Annual NZ Games for the Deaf in Christchurch provided valuable experience for hosting the World Deaf Games to be held in Christchurch in January 1989. At Cowles Stadium, Shona McGhie and Tony Walton are also interviewed by News Review.
Deaf Society of Canterbury
2023
video – Taonga source: Speak Up Kōrerotia

Speak Up Kōrerotia – Deaf Education in Aotearoa

This special NZSL Week show looks at the history and progression of deaf education in Aotearoa over time, from the oral method of communication taught for decades to the current use and teaching of NZSL. We interview Kay Drew (former teacher at the Van Asch Deaf Education Centre in Christchurch, and a CODA - child of deaf adults) and Sara Pivac Alexander (Te Herenga Waka Victoria University)
Speak Up Kōrerotia
1987
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: December 1987 (Vol. 1 No. 4)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1988
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: March 1988 (Vol. 2, No. 1)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1992
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: December 1992

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1993
video – Taonga source: Hilda Tamepo

John & Laura Hunt’s farewell party

A farewell party is thrown for John and Laura Hunt at the Auckland Deaf Society, prior to their move to Melbourne. The farewell was attended by over 100 members of the Auckland Deaf community.
Hilda Tamepo
1987
article – Taonga source: The Dominion

Communicating from a silent world

Jenny Griffiths, the mother of two profoundly deaf children, talks about communicating with them in Total Communication.
2001
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Loud and clear

The deaf community believes it has been misunderstood and misinterpreted for too long. Now it wants to be seen and heard as a group with its own cultural identity.
2000
video – Taonga source: Deaf Aotearoa

Inside Out: The Art of Signing

Inside Out produces a programme about New Zealand Sign Language, its value to the Deaf community as well as its artistic forms.
Deaf Aotearoa
2006
video – Taonga source: Ko Taku Reo, Deaf Education New Zealand

NZSL becomes an official language of New Zealand

On 6th April 2006, members of the Deaf community and supporters gathered on the steps of parliament to celebrate the NZSL Bill passing its Third Reading, becoming the NZSL Act (2006). This marked the end of a long journey to give NZSL official status in Aotearoa New Zealand. This footage was screened on TV3 that evening.
Ko Taku Reo, Deaf Education New Zealand
1986
article – Taonga source: Zealandia

A capital reception

An interpreter passes on the Pope's message to the deaf during the outdoor Mass at Athletic Park.
1996
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: March 1996

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1993
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

Spotlight on Pasifika Deaf

Tangata Pasifika visits Kelston Deaf Education Centre and meets with a number of Pasifika Deaf students part of the school’s transition programme, interviewing Rosie Amituanai and her family.
Television New Zealand Archive
1994
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

NZ gets 8 more NZSL interpreters from the first AIT Diploma class

The first graduates of the Diploma in NZSL Interpreting course will start working in the community, enabling Deaf people to achieve their rights to access a range of settings and services.
Television New Zealand Archive
1992
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: June 1992

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1992
article – Taonga source: The Dominion

Needs of deaf people given ‘low’ priority

New Zealand Sign Language must be given official recognition as a language or it will die, Deaf Association President Jennifer Brain says.
2003
article – Taonga source: Victoria News, Victoria University of Wellington

NZSL dictionary includes te reo Māori

Deaf New Zealanders now have access to te reo Māori vocabulary in the Online Dictionary of NZSL, compiled by Victoria’s Deaf Studies Research Unit.
1985
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Ready to lend helping hands to deaf

The class of eight graduates tonight after four months' study learning the variety of sign language used by New Zealand deaf people.
1987
video – Taonga source: Deaf Society of Canterbury

‘News Review’ puts a spotlight on the New Zealand Deaf Games in Christchurch over the weekend of 23 – 26 October 1987

The 32nd New Zealand Games for the Deaf is featured on News Review, covering athletics, basketball, table tennis, lawn bowls and netball. The question, ‘Why have a Deaf Games?’ is put forward to competitors and officials! Footage also features the much appreciated ‘Canterbury Duck’ that Deaf kids had requested more of!
Deaf Society of Canterbury
1997
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: Spring 1997

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1985
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

First sign language interpreting course

An insight into the teaching and learning of those involved in the first sign language interpreting course in New Zealand 1985.
Television New Zealand Archive
1992
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

NZSL interpreting course begins

The first NZSL interpreting course has recently started in Auckland, being led by Drs. David and Rachel McKee. We take a peek at one of their NZSL classes, and Rachel predicts the areas of work graduates will go into.
Television New Zealand Archive
2001
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: February 2001

Oticon Foundation