2001
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

Māori Deaf Wānanga

Wānanga held in 2001, involving both Deaf and hearing Māori, focusing on NZSL skills, learning about community and culture as well as socialising and having fun.
Rūaumoko Komiti
2004
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

Being Māori Deaf: Interview with Patrick Thompson

Raw footage of an interview with Patrick Thompson attempting to connect with a Māori culture he was denied growing up. Patrick provides a voice for Māori Deaf, to grow understanding about the challenges they face, and to promote the importance of NZSL.
Rūaumoko Komiti
2004
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

The experiences of Māori Deaf

This segment from Māori TV’s Te Hēteri focuses on the experiences of Māori Deaf, catching up with Patrick Thompson, Whiti Ronaki, and Hemi Hema.
Rūaumoko Komiti
1990
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: June 1990 (Vol. 4, No. 2)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
2004
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

A Day in the Life of Rūaumoko Marae

Insight into the preparations that go into a powhiri onto Rūaumoko Marae, and rare footage of the powhiri itself, followed by an interview with Patrick Thompson.
Rūaumoko Komiti
2000
video – Taonga source: Deaf Aotearoa

Deaf Association of New Zealand 2000

A look at the work of the New Zealand Association of the Deaf, presented by Judy Bailey.
Deaf Aotearoa
2001
video – Taonga source: DEAFinitely Youth Group

Miss and Mr Deaf New Zealand, 2001

The ‘007’ themed Miss and Mr Deaf New Zealand event, expertly hosted by Victoria Skorikova and Tony Walton was a major fundraising event for the 2nd Asia Pacific Deaf Youth Camp. It was organised in 5 weeks and raised $7,000 towards camp costs.
DEAFinitely Youth Group
1998
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: Autumn 1998

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1992
video – Taonga source: Point of View Productions

‘See What I Mean’

'See What I Mean' presents two real-life stories: the story of a family who were all born Deaf, and a journalist who loses her hearing. It offers positive advice about hearing loss as well as celebrating the New Zealand Deaf community.
Point of View Productions
1990s
video – Taonga source: Hilda Tamepo

Deaf kaumatua celebrates 50 years of life at Auckland Deaf Society

The 50th birthday of Ivan Tamepo - a respected Deaf elder – is celebrated at ADS, with a karanga, powhiri, waitaia and celebrations in the back hall and upstairs clubroom.
Hilda Tamepo
2005
video – Taonga source: DEAFinitely Youth Group

1st National Deaf Youth Camp, 2005

The 1st National Deaf Youth Camp – April 2005 at Finlay Adventure Park, Cambridge – was supported and organised by DEAFinitely Youth Group (DYG). It was founded in 2000 to host the 2nd Asia-Pacific Deaf Youth Camp, and it went on to support the 1st NDYC with 25 participants and 5 different workshops.
DEAFinitely Youth Group
2003
article – Taonga source: Victoria News, Victoria University of Wellington

NZSL dictionary includes te reo Māori

Deaf New Zealanders now have access to te reo Māori vocabulary in the Online Dictionary of NZSL, compiled by Victoria’s Deaf Studies Research Unit.
2004
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

Māori Deaf join foreshore hīkoi

Māori Deaf participating in a hīkoi (protest march) in support of Māori claims of ownership of the New Zealand foreshore and seabed.
Rūaumoko Komiti
2002
video – Taonga source: Sara Pivac Alexander

International Postcard: New Zealand

DeafTV from Denmark makes a trip to New Zealand to feature the country and its Deaf community on its ‘International Postcard’ series, with scenes from a normal Friday night at the Deaf Club, a trip to the Deaf Association office. The Deaf Danish crew are also welcomed onto the Rūaumoko Marae.
Sara Pivac Alexander
1999
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

Deaf Association opens its new Auckland office

The Deaf Association of New Zealand opens its new offices on Great North Road, Avondale, Auckland in November 1999.
Rūaumoko Komiti
Featured Story
Community Life and Places

The 2nd Asia Pacific Deaf Youth camp

The 2nd Asia Pacific Deaf Youth camp (APDYC) was held from 12-19 January 2002 at the Sir Edmund Hillary Outdoor Pursuits Centre in Turangi. Altogether, there were 43 Deaf youths from 12 countries, 15 youth leaders, 10 interpreters and a couple of guest speakers present.
2017
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Bringing te reo to deaf Māori

Māori concepts like tikanga, iwi and kaumātua don't exist in English-based sign language. And it means deaf Māori have been deprived of their culture, Hamilton-based interpreter Stephanie Awheto said. But that's changing, albeit slowly.
Stuff
2014
publication – Taonga source: St Dominic’s Catholic Deaf Centre

Deaf Southern Star: 2014 (Vol. 36, No. 2)

St Dominic’s Catholic Deaf Centre
1999
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

Mai Time features NZSL!

Mai Time made one of their episodes accessible in NZSL to mark Deaf Awareness Week 1999. KDEC’s sign singing choir and Patrick Thompson made an appearance along with as did Rūaumoko Marae’s kapa haka roopu.
Rūaumoko Komiti
2004
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

Patrick Thompson’s ‘Te Hēteri’ interview – unedited footage

Unedited footage of Patrick Thompson’s ‘Te Hēteri’ interview at the famed Star Sign Cafe on Auckland’s Dominion Road in 2004.
Rūaumoko Komiti
Featured Story
Community Life and Places

Friends for Young Deaf (FYD)

The Friends for Young Deaf (FYD) movement swept through New Zealand when Christoph Blum was appointed as Youth Coordinator in 1994 after training in England in the early 1990s. The theoretical components of leadership were put into practice on a real-time basis, merging with the Kiwi love of camps and outdoor living. Many of today’s young Deaf leaders participated in an FYD camp at some stage of their development.
1993
video – Taonga source: Deaf Aotearoa

Opening of Deaf Association’s new premises in New Lynn, Auckland

The opening of the Deaf Association National Office and the Auckland Branch Office at the Ceramic House in Totara Avenue, New Lynn on 18 June 1993.
Deaf Aotearoa
1996
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

Patrick Thompson discusses upcoming wānanga for Māori Deaf

Patrick Thompson is interviewed on the ‘Marae’ programme, a bilingual Māori and English language current affairs show, about setting up a wānanga to enable Māori Deaf to access te reo Maori and Tikanga Maori.
Television New Zealand Archive
1994
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: March 1994

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
biography
Profile

Patrick Thompson (QSM)

Patrick was of Ngati Paoa/Ngati Whanaunga descent. He was instrumental in organising the first National Hui for Māori Deaf in 1993. Throughout his career, Patrick acted as an advisor to many groups in the Māori and Deaf communities. Patrick was a strong advocate for training and supporting more trilingual interpreters, and for empowering Māori Deaf people to have greater access to both mainstream society and Māori tikanga.
2004
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

Opening of the Advance Centre

The opening of the Advance Centre, a tertiary support centre for Deaf and hearing impaired students in the Auckland region, attended by Hon Ruth Dyson, Minister for Disability Issues, and Patrick Thompson - Māori Deaf leader.
Rūaumoko Komiti
2004
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

The Māori Deaf world: Interviews with Whiti Ronaki, Stephanie Awheto and Michael Wi

This raw, edited footage consists of interviews with Whiti Ronaki, Michael Wi and Stephanie Awheto - a trilingual interpreter, on topics relevant in the Māori Deaf world.
Rūaumoko Komiti
2006
video – Taonga source: Handmade Productions Aotearoa

Sign of the Times: The Story of New Zealand’s Visual Language

In April 2006, New Zealand Parliament declared NZSL to be an official language - the culmination of a 20-year battle by the deaf community, and a true hallmark in the recognition of their native language. 'Sign of the Times' is about the deaf New Zealanders who fought to have their language recognised as a real language and as a viable means of communication. The film documents the community's celebration of the official recognition of their language and looks at the community's ongoing hopes and aspirations for their language and culture.
Handmade Productions Aotearoa