2019
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Deaf children need better access to New Zealand Sign Language to close the education gap

Lack of access to interpreters means deaf children are missing out on education. There are about 3600 children in the deaf education system, of which about 96 per cent attend mainstream schools. There are just three NZSL educational interpreters working full time with students, meaning most children were missing out.
Stuff
2019
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Using sign language as a family

The Fergusons are an average family of five who have fun, sometimes fight but mostly get along. The main difference is that three of them are deaf, and NZSL is the first language for the whole family. How does this work in a busy household with two teens and a toddler? We spend a few days with the Fergusons and discover it works remarkably well. Especially for the eldest Zoe who is exploring advocating for New Zealand deaf youth.
Attitude Pictures
2014
video – Taonga source: Ministry of Education

National Deaf Youth Hui 2014

In August 2014, the Ministry of Education brought Deaf students together from across New Zealand for a weekend of ideas, learning and friendship. The Ministry called the hui to better understand what school is really like for Deaf students and to gather their ideas on how things could be improved. This video captures the workshops, fun activities and growing friendships that happened over the weekend.
Ministry of Education
2019
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Travelling with sign language

Last week we met the Fergusons, a family of five who communicate using NZSL. Here, we join the Fergusons on their trip of a lifetime attending the World Federation of the Deaf Congress — in Paris.
Attitude Pictures
2014
publication – Taonga source: Wellington Deaf Society

Absolutely Positively Windy Deaf: May 2014

Wellington Deaf Society
2014
article – Taonga source: The Wellingtonian

A modern tale of two deaf children

Deaf pupil Rahui Lee, 11, leads the year 7 and 8 class in a sign language game of mastermind, in which pupils have to guess a mystery four-digit number by signing.