2023
article – Taonga source: The Northland Age

Sign of the times: Teaching of New Zealand’s third official language growing ‘bigger and better’

Far North Mayor Moko Tepania may be the best-known Far North face learning NZSL, but he’s in growing company.
The Northland Age
2019
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Deaf children need better access to New Zealand Sign Language to close the education gap

Lack of access to interpreters means deaf children are missing out on education. There are about 3600 children in the deaf education system, of which about 96 per cent attend mainstream schools. There are just three NZSL educational interpreters working full time with students, meaning most children were missing out.
Stuff
2019
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Travelling with sign language

Last week we met the Fergusons, a family of five who communicate using NZSL. Here, we join the Fergusons on their trip of a lifetime attending the World Federation of the Deaf Congress — in Paris.
Attitude Pictures
2006
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: February 2006

Oticon Foundation
2022
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Unique Wellington school for Deaf students where sign language rules could help more kids, community says

Parents and teachers at a unique school for Deaf students within a school believe more children in Wellington could benefit from the service. And they are calling for a high school to be set up to teach Deaf students across the region.
Stuff
2019
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Using sign language as a family

The Fergusons are an average family of five who have fun, sometimes fight but mostly get along. The main difference is that three of them are deaf, and NZSL is the first language for the whole family. How does this work in a busy household with two teens and a toddler? We spend a few days with the Fergusons and discover it works remarkably well. Especially for the eldest Zoe who is exploring advocating for New Zealand deaf youth.
Attitude Pictures
2022
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Being Me: Jared Flitcroft

Jared Flitcroft is a filmmaker, a businessman, a family man, and he is Deaf. Despite being fluent in Te Reo and NZSL, Jared faced barriers in the largely hearing-led film industry where so much depended on him hearing and communicating with those around him. Undeterred, he began creating his own inclusive projects.
Attitude Pictures
2006
video – Taonga source: Handmade Productions Aotearoa

Sign of the Times: The Story of New Zealand’s Visual Language

In April 2006, New Zealand Parliament declared NZSL to be an official language - the culmination of a 20-year battle by the deaf community, and a true hallmark in the recognition of their native language. 'Sign of the Times' is about the deaf New Zealanders who fought to have their language recognised as a real language and as a viable means of communication. The film documents the community's celebration of the official recognition of their language and looks at the community's ongoing hopes and aspirations for their language and culture.
Handmade Productions Aotearoa