2013
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: March 2013

Oticon Foundation
1995
article – Taonga source: Victoria News, Victoria University of Wellington

Black magic hat

Shaun Fahey was wearing the right hat when Black Magic won the America's Cup – but he couldn't throw it in the air to celebrate. His hat is actually a replica of the New Zealand boat, 71cm long and 110cm high, complete with seascape, dolphin, buoy, fish and an array of sponsors' stickers.
1989
article – Taonga source: The Dominion

‘Real’ sign language studied

Deaf people have evolved a sophisticated language which is little understood by hearing people and is officially ignored, according to American linguist Marianne Collins-Ahlgren.
2023
video – Taonga source: Speak Up Kōrerotia

Speak Up Kōrerotia – Deaf Education in Aotearoa

This special NZSL Week show looks at the history and progression of deaf education in Aotearoa over time, from the oral method of communication taught for decades to the current use and teaching of NZSL. We interview Kay Drew (former teacher at the Van Asch Deaf Education Centre in Christchurch, and a CODA - child of deaf adults) and Sara Pivac Alexander (Te Herenga Waka Victoria University)
Speak Up Kōrerotia
1993
article – Taonga source: The Evening Post

Advanced computer data base backs NZ’s first sign language dictionary

Managing editor Professor Graeme Kennedy said the project had developed the most advanced computer database in the world for analysing and recording sign language.
1997
article – Taonga source: The Evening Post

First NZ sign language dictionary

'Wellington' and 'All Black' are just two of hundreds of familiar Kiwi terms – such as Milo, Weetbix, pakeha, Maori and marae – described in A Dictionary of New Zealand Sign Language to ve released next week.
2012
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: March 2012

Oticon Foundation
2009
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: September 2009

Oticon Foundation
1989
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Sign language boost

Research on the complex sign language that deaf New Zealanders have created could push education authorities to recognise the language's authenticity. It has taken an American linguist to document the distinctive language.
1997
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: Spring 1997

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
2014
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: February 2014

Oticon Foundation