2022
article – Taonga source: The Northern Advocate

Northland marae set up te reo and deaf sign programmes to grow national languages

Twenty marae across Northland want to grow the number of whānau who can speak te reo Māori ... in sign language. An eight week course, He Aha, is about to get under way to help whānau improve communication with tangata turi.
The Northern Advocate
2013
article – Taonga source: Kōkiri Magazine

Māori Deaf Gather

Last year on Queen’s Birthday weekend, Hamilton man Hemi Hema was honoured for his tireless work advocating for opportunities for Māori Deaf. This Queen’s Birthday weekend he was showing that his great work continues – facilitating a hui for Māori Deaf from throughout Aotearoa aimed at focusing on new beginnings for their community.
Kōkiri Magazine
2014
video – Taonga source: Ministry of Education

Acknowledgements – Ko Wai Au? Who Am I? See My Voice?

An acknowledgement to all the team who helped make the Ko Wai Au? Who Am I? See My Voice? exhibition possible. Ko Wai Au is an exhibition empowering Māori rangatahi who identify as Deaf to communicate with others leading to a wider understanding of aspirations as young Deaf Māori.
Ministry of Education
2011
video – Taonga source: Deaf Aotearoa New Zealand

God Defend New Zealand: New Zealand National Anthem in NZSL, Maori & English

In NZSL with subtitles in Māori and English; created in collaboration with native speakers of NZSL, Māori & English, and sign language linguists from the Deaf community, with the purpose to create a NZSL translation that was true to the meaning behind the Māori & English lyrics.
Deaf Aotearoa New Zealand
2022
article – Taonga source: The Northern Advocate

Te Wiki o te Reo Māori – Māori Language Week: Deaf Northlander Eddie Hokianga

Deaf Northlander Eddie Hokianga was on a troubled trajectory in life until he got his hands on te reo and connected with his Māori culture. Hokianga (Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngā Puhi, Ngāti Porou) and Kim Robinson of Deaf Action New Zealand are delivering a groundbreaking initiative in the form of an eight-week course to be held, ideally, across 20 Northland marae.
The Northern Advocate
1996
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

Patrick Thompson discusses upcoming wānanga for Māori Deaf

Patrick Thompson is interviewed on the ‘Marae’ programme, a bilingual Māori and English language current affairs show, about setting up a wānanga to enable Māori Deaf to access te reo Maori and Tikanga Maori.
Television New Zealand Archive
2022
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Being Me: Jared Flitcroft

Jared Flitcroft is a filmmaker, a businessman, a family man, and he is Deaf. Despite being fluent in Te Reo and NZSL, Jared faced barriers in the largely hearing-led film industry where so much depended on him hearing and communicating with those around him. Undeterred, he began creating his own inclusive projects.
Attitude Pictures
2017
video – Taonga source: New Zealand Society of Translators and Interpreters

Te Tiriti o Waitangi in New Zealand Sign Language

This resource was created for the Treaty Times Thirty project, an initative by the New Zealand Society of Translators and Interpreters to translate New Zealand’s founding document, Te Tiriti of Waitangi into 30 different languages.
New Zealand Society of Translators and Interpreters
Rūaumoko Komiti – Turi Māori
Rūaumoko Komiti – Turi Māori
Rūaumoko Komiti – Turi Māori
Collection
Collection

Rūaumoko Komiti – Turi Māori

Tihei mauri ora! Turi Māori are here! SignDNA is proud to present the Turi Māori collection of historic video taonga. The majority of the content of the Turi Māori collection was donated by the Rūaumoko Komiti, with invaluable footage of wānanga, hikoi, and other important korero.
Rūaumoko Komiti
2004
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

A Day in the Life of Rūaumoko Marae

Insight into the preparations that go into a powhiri onto Rūaumoko Marae, and rare footage of the powhiri itself, followed by an interview with Patrick Thompson.
Rūaumoko Komiti
2014
video – Taonga source: Ministry of Education

Ko Wai Au? Who Am I? See My Voice?

A video with six rangatahi communicating their stories of being young Turi Māori (Māori Deaf). The topics they discuss include recognition and acknowledgement of Deaf people in the past, Dame Whina Cooper and the impact of Kelston Deaf Education Centre.
Ministry of Education
2023
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald.

Whaikaha the first ministry with a name in all of NZ’s official languages

Whaikaha – Ministry of Disabled People has become the first and only government ministry with a name in all three of New Zealand’s official languages.
NZ Herald.
1997
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

A korero with Riwia Fox, Māori NZSL interpreter

Riwia Fox, an interpreter is interviewed about her work as a trilingual interpreter. At that time, Riwia was one of only two qualified NZSL interpreters in New Zealand who are Māori, with the other being Stephanie Awheto.
Television New Zealand Archive
1997
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: Winter 1997

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
2017
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Bringing te reo to deaf Māori

Māori concepts like tikanga, iwi and kaumātua don't exist in English-based sign language. And it means deaf Māori have been deprived of their culture, Hamilton-based interpreter Stephanie Awheto said. But that's changing, albeit slowly.
Stuff
2016
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Accessible Marae – The Reply

A short video promoting an accessible marae funded by the Think Differently campaign, featuring Mita Moses.
Attitude Pictures
2004
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

The Māori Deaf world: Interviews with Whiti Ronaki, Stephanie Awheto and Michael Wi

This raw, edited footage consists of interviews with Whiti Ronaki, Michael Wi and Stephanie Awheto - a trilingual interpreter, on topics relevant in the Māori Deaf world.
Rūaumoko Komiti
1997
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

Hunga Turi: Māori Deaf have their first accessible stay on a marae

‘Te Karare’ was present to witness members of the Māori Deaf community have their first accessible stay on Kokohinau marae.
Television New Zealand Archive
2018
video – Taonga source: Deaf Children New Zealand

NZSL and Us: Diamond Johnson, Hamilton

Diamond is a bubbly and active little girl who loves a challenge. Her whānau embraces all three of New Zealand’s languages: English, Te Reo Māori and NZSL. Her mother is determined to improve her NZSL by attending sign language classes so she that she will be able to communicate with Diamond fully as she grows up. Her whānau has a strong commitment to ensure Diamond is exposed to as much NZSL as possible including access to Deaf role models.
Deaf Children New Zealand
2004
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

The experiences of Māori Deaf

This segment from Māori TV’s Te Hēteri focuses on the experiences of Māori Deaf, catching up with Patrick Thompson, Whiti Ronaki, and Hemi Hema.
Rūaumoko Komiti
2021
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald.

Deaf Northlander Eddie Hokianga urges Māori to turn their hand towards trilingual interpreter roles

Northland sign language tutor Eddie Hokianga has taken up the task of ensuring the region's deaf Māori community is heard. Hokianga (Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngā Puhi, Ngāti Porou) has spent the last three years teaching te reo sign language to help fill a national void of interpreters fluent in the discourse.
NZ Herald.