2023
article – Taonga source: Bay of Plenty Times

Deaf couple use sign language to organise building a new house

A new house build can be a challenging time for a young couple. But Gregory and Victoria Lessing are also deaf, and undertook a house build from scratch using NZSL.
Bay of Plenty Times
1991
video – Taonga source: Dorothy Jones

NZSL Tutors attend an intensive City Lit Training course in London

In the history of NZSL teaching, perhaps the most important development was when 8 NZSL tutors attended a two-week intensive teaching course in London in 1991. Watch this condensed version (taking from almost 29 hours of footage!) to get a sense of what the training was like.
Dorothy Jones
2019
video – Taonga source: Merge NZ

Interview: Jamie Brown from Merge NZ talks about the impacts and benefits of learning NZSL

Jaime Brown, Merge NZ Co-Director, learned NZSL and didn't just find a language, but a community and a passion. Seecus talks to Jaime about the impacts NZSL has had for her and the benefits of learning sign language.
Merge NZ
1989
article – Taonga source: Christchurch Star

More than 1300 involved

About 100 interpreters have been trained in Christchurch over the last year. The classes were organised by the hearing people but the deaf were the teachers. It is only the second time that New Zealand sign language has been taught in this country.
1991
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Signs break the ice

Lower Hutt's Myra Sullivan showing hearing people how to use sign language at a workshop for the deaf held at Wellington College of Education yesterday.
1991
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: March 1991 (Vol. 5, No. 1)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1998
article – Taonga source: The Evening Post

Graduates silent but definitely not joyless

A group of graduating Victoria University students never spoke a word yesterday during the quietest graduation party ever held. The students were New Zealand's first to graduate with a certificate in Deaf studies.
2023
article – Taonga source: The Northland Age

Sign of the times: Teaching of New Zealand’s third official language growing ‘bigger and better’

Far North Mayor Moko Tepania may be the best-known Far North face learning NZSL, but he’s in growing company.
The Northland Age
1993
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: March 1993

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
2006
article – Taonga source: Unknown

NZ sign language becomes official

The room is full of waving hands and exaggerated facial gestures. Even though the room is silent the dozen women are "talking" with each other just as volubly as if they were having a chinwag. It is a women's only class in New Zealand's latest offical language - NZSL.
2016
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

NZSL has become an integral part of Coffee Educators

Not long after opening Co-Ed Cafe and the associated training school, Claire Matheson began running courses for students of Newlands College Deaf Unit. NZSL is now used in meetings and training, and they have menus in sign language.
Attitude Pictures
2018
video – Taonga source: Merge NZ

NZSLTA Hui 2018

The New Zealand Sign Language Teacher's Association Hui in October 2018 was a great weekend of professional development for those that teach, and want to teach NZSL.
Merge NZ
2022
NZSL story – Taonga source: Janet Watt

Teaching sign language in preparation for the Christchurch 1989 World Deaf Games

Once New Zealand was awarded the host of the XVIth World Deaf Games at Los Angeles 1985, there was a realisation that sign language classes needed to commence in preparation for Christchurch 1989.
Janet Watt
1989
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: December 1989 (Vol. 3, No. 4)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
2022
article – Taonga source: The Northern Advocate

Northland marae set up te reo and deaf sign programmes to grow national languages

Twenty marae across Northland want to grow the number of whānau who can speak te reo Māori ... in sign language. An eight week course, He Aha, is about to get under way to help whānau improve communication with tangata turi.
The Northern Advocate
2019
video – Taonga source: Merge NZ

After decades of crusading for NZ’s deaf community, Auckland woman honoured as ‘local hero’

The New Zealander of the Year will be announced tonight and as part of it, a number of local heroes have been recognised. One of them is Aucklander Victoria Lessing, who has been deaf her whole life and has spent 20 years raising the profile of NZSL. Two years ago, her passion developed into a company called Merge NZ, which she runs alongside her business partner, Jaime Brown.
Merge NZ
2019
video – Taonga source: Merge NZ

Interview: Victoria Lessing from Merge NZ talks about learning NZSL and its benefits

Victoria Lessing, Merge NZ Co-Director, talks with Seecus about learning NZSL and its benefits.
Merge NZ
2008
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Nirvana teaching Sign Language

She’s a great mum and teacher and she’s deaf. Nirvana Graham is creating history by teaching our third official language in mainstream school.
Attitude Pictures
2016
article – Taonga source: Manawatū Standard

Teaching the deaf since 1973

Teaching for almost 50 years has proved a rewarding career for Terry O'Brien, who has witnessed the development of deaf education. He has seen the transition of deaf education from an emphasis on teaching verbally and through text, to an emphasis on Signed English then NZSL in the 90s.
1992
article – Taonga source: Unknown

New ideas from London course on teaching

Rebecca was recently chosen, aong with seven other deaf New Zealanders, to attend a two-week training course in London to learn the basic concepts of teaching sign language.
2019
article – Taonga source: Manawatū Standard.

Deaf woman helps others learn sign language over a pint

Candice David was only 3 when she lost her hearing. Now, she's helping others learn her only form of communication, NZSL. Candice was at Palmerston North bar Brew Union on Sunday, offering free NZSL tutorials to all patrons.
Manawatū Standard.
2018
article – Taonga source: Stuff

An ‘inspirational’ deaf teacher is teaching sign language to hearing toddlers

One deaf teacher in south Auckland has inspired several toddlers and their parents to learn sign language.
Stuff
2023
video – Taonga source: Speak Up Kōrerotia

Speak Up Kōrerotia – Deaf Education in Aotearoa

This special NZSL Week show looks at the history and progression of deaf education in Aotearoa over time, from the oral method of communication taught for decades to the current use and teaching of NZSL. We interview Kay Drew (former teacher at the Van Asch Deaf Education Centre in Christchurch, and a CODA - child of deaf adults) and Sara Pivac Alexander (Te Herenga Waka Victoria University)
Speak Up Kōrerotia
2010
article – Taonga source: Manawatū Standard

Sign language ‘necessity not choice’

Six months after deaf and hearing-impaired children in the region lost their deaf tutor, problems with the teaching of NZSL continue. "NZSL is not a choice, it's a necessity and we have to give these kids a voice," mother Charmaine Strickland said.
1991
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: June 1991 (Vol. 5, No. 2)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1993
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: June 1993

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1990
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: June 1990 (Vol. 4, No. 2)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
2003
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: September 2003

Oticon Foundation
1990
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: March 1990 (Vol. 4, No. 1)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1989
publication – Taonga source: New Zealand Deaf News

NZ Deaf News: Spring 1989 (Vol. 23, No. 3)