2023
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Meredith Karim can listen and speak, but she thinks in sign language

Meredith Karim​ was just five months old when she started using NZSL to communicate. She was born a hearing child to deaf parents, often known by the acronym CODA. She says while most people have a voice talking in their heads expressing their thoughts, she visualises hers in NZSL.
Stuff
2023
article – Taonga source: Bay of Plenty Times

Deaf couple use sign language to organise building a new house

A new house build can be a challenging time for a young couple. But Gregory and Victoria Lessing are also deaf, and undertook a house build from scratch using NZSL.
Bay of Plenty Times
2023
article – Taonga source: Woman’s Day

Erica Dawson’s sign language battle ‘We’re nothing to be afraid of’

"There's still a lot of barriers for deaf people in this country," says Erica, who lost her hearing when she was six months old. "We face all sorts of challenges that hearing people take for granted, such as finding interpreters to help us with schoolwork or meetings at work."
Woman’s Day
2015
publication – Taonga source: Wellington Deaf Society

Wellington Deaf Society: May 2015 newsletter

Wellington Deaf Society
2023
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Future leaders of Deaf community share vision for NZ Sign Language

While NZSL Week runs from May 8-14, young leaders of the Deaf community are continuously advocating for their culture and language in the hearing world every other week of the year.
Stuff
2019
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Deaf children need better access to New Zealand Sign Language to close the education gap

Lack of access to interpreters means deaf children are missing out on education. There are about 3600 children in the deaf education system, of which about 96 per cent attend mainstream schools. There are just three NZSL educational interpreters working full time with students, meaning most children were missing out.
Stuff
2020
article – Taonga source: Stuff

I feel included’: How press briefings with NZSL are making a difference

For many people in the Deaf community, the coronavirus pandemic was the most they had ever seen their language on television. But its meant more than simply accessing information – it includes the Deaf community in conversations.
Stuff
2014
publication – Taonga source: Wellington Deaf Society

Wellington Deaf Society: May 2014 newsletter

Wellington Deaf Society
2011
article – Taonga source: Timaru Herald

Deaf call for more interpreters

Christchurch's devastating earthquakes changed the lives of many people. Timaru couple Julie Nielson and Paul O'Donnell could finally turn off their television subtitles thanks to the sign language interpreters who stood beside Christchurch mayor Bob Parker as he addressed the public on a daily basis.
Timaru Herald
2019
article – Taonga source: Manawatū Standard

Deaf woman helps others learn sign language over a pint

Candice David was only 3 when she lost her hearing. Now, she's helping others learn her only form of communication, NZSL. Candice was at Palmerston North bar Brew Union on Sunday, offering free NZSL tutorials to all patrons.
Manawatū Standard
2016
article – Taonga source: The Press.

Deaf chef Kristofer Jonsson encourages others to break through barriers

Kristofer Jonsson is a calm and quiet chef, never yelling at anyone in the kitchen, and for good reason – he's deaf. "I focus on the visual side – you can look at the colour, where things are browning."
The Press.
2016
publication – Taonga source: Wellington Deaf Society

Wellington Deaf Society: June 2016 newsletter

Wellington Deaf Society
2017
article – Taonga source: Western Leader

Growing up CODA

Jack and Oliver Leach switch between two languages. Their parents Monica and Stephen Leach are both deaf. "It's awesome because we can be really loud," Oliver said. The brothers who can hear, had grown up as CODA - or Children of Deaf Adults.
Western Leader
2021
article – Taonga source: Nelson Mail

Face masks creating anxiety and stress in the Deaf community

Stress and anxiety is bubbling in the Deaf community as it struggles to communicate with the public through face masks. They were “struggling” at the supermarket because they relied on lipreading to communicate. “Masks are creating a bit of a problem."
Nelson Mail
2015
publication – Taonga source: Wellington Deaf Society

Wellington Deaf Society: June 2015 newsletter

Wellington Deaf Society
2023
article – Taonga source: The Northland Age

Sign of the times: Teaching of New Zealand’s third official language growing ‘bigger and better’

Far North Mayor Moko Tepania may be the best-known Far North face learning NZSL, but he’s in growing company.
The Northland Age
2020
article – Taonga source: Waikato Times

Masks causing issues for deaf Waikato man

Wearing a face mask is meant to help slow the spread of Covid-19. But for Tokoroa’s Roger Drower, who is partially deaf, they’ve left him feeling discriminated and isolated.
Waikato Times