2009
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: September 2009

Oticon Foundation
1986
article – Taonga source: NZPA

Communing In Silence

Deaf people gatherered near the front of the papal Mass as interpreter Rachel Locker translated for them. She said it was one of the hardest job she had done because of the religious language.
1987
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

‘Deaf Book’: First NZSL dictionary makes it to print

Dan Levitt’s work on the first NZSL dictionary in 1985 popularised the name, ‘New Zealand Sign Language’. In this news segment, Dan describes the different between the English Signing System and NZSL.
Television New Zealand Archive
2021
article – Taonga source: The Northern Advocate

Deaf community rally for fully funded sign language interpreters at festivals and events

Northland's deaf community are rallying to get sign language interpreters at major events, anniversaries and festivals such as Waitangi Day and Anzac Day commemorations. Deaf Action NZ and Tū Tāngata Turi want the Government to fully fund New Zealand sign language interpreters for formal coverage of events, along with social interpreting throughout the day.
The Northern Advocate
1999
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

Mai Time features NZSL!

Mai Time made one of their episodes accessible in NZSL to mark Deaf Awareness Week 1999. KDEC’s sign singing choir and Patrick Thompson made an appearance along with as did Rūaumoko Marae’s kapa haka roopu.
Rūaumoko Komiti
1989
article – Taonga source: Christchurch Star

More than 1300 involved

About 100 interpreters have been trained in Christchurch over the last year. The classes were organised by the hearing people but the deaf were the teachers. It is only the second time that New Zealand sign language has been taught in this country.
1996-97
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: Summer 1996/97

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1986
publication – Taonga source: New Zealand Deaf News

NZ Deaf News: Summer 1986 (Vol. 22, No. 3)

1994
article – Taonga source: City Voice

In the mainstream

Theresa Newson and Maria Griffiths are completely deaf. They are also students at St Catherine's College, Kilbirnie. Their mothers looked at several schools in the Wellington region because they wanted their daughters to stay at home rather than go to Van Asch.
1980
video – Taonga source: Sue Penman

Sumner School for the Deaf 100 Years Centenary celebration

Footage by Sue Penman, of members of the Deaf community and their families attending the centenary celebrations at Sumner School for the Deaf, and taking a tour of the school.
Sue Penman
1987
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: June 1987 (Vol. 1, No. 2)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1997
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

A korero with Riwia Fox, Māori NZSL interpreter

Riwia Fox, an interpreter is interviewed about her work as a trilingual interpreter. At that time, Riwia was one of only two qualified NZSL interpreters in New Zealand who are Māori, with the other being Stephanie Awheto.
Television New Zealand Archive
2002
video – Taonga source: Dorothy Jones

Auckland Schools for Deaf: 60th Reunion

Weekend celebrations are kickstarted with a Māori Deaf kapa haka group to perform a haka powhiri. Vintage teachers such as Les Bury briefly summarise their experiences of working in Deaf education over the years.
Dorothy Jones
1988
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: March 1988 (Vol. 2, No. 1)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1992
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: June 1992

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1991
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: December 1991

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1989
video – Taonga source: Deaf Aotearoa

National Foundation for the Deaf promotional video

National Foundation for the Deaf produce a promotional video explaining their role and the purpose of their member organisations.
Deaf Aotearoa
2004
article – Taonga source: The Dominion

Sign of the times

Sign language interpreter Rosie Henley translates for the deaf beside Speaker of the House Jonathon Hunt as MPs debate legislation making New Zealand sign language an official language.
2014
article – Taonga source: The Wellingtonian

A modern tale of two deaf children

Deaf pupil Rahui Lee, 11, leads the year 7 and 8 class in a sign language game of mastermind, in which pupils have to guess a mystery four-digit number by signing.
1985
publication – Taonga source: New Zealand Deaf News

NZ Deaf News: Autumn 1985 (Vol. 22, No. 1)

1990
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Ivan Curry case goes to police authority

The Police Minister expects the Police Complaints Authority to inquire into questions arising from the documentary 'The Remand of Ivan Curry'.
2022
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Being Me: Jared Flitcroft

Jared Flitcroft is a filmmaker, a businessman, a family man, and he is Deaf. Despite being fluent in Te Reo and NZSL, Jared faced barriers in the largely hearing-led film industry where so much depended on him hearing and communicating with those around him. Undeterred, he began creating his own inclusive projects.
Attitude Pictures
1991
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Deaf find unfair hearings in court

Deaf people have had unfair trials through lack of interpreters telling them what is happening in courts.
1989
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald

Deaf ‘denied basic rights’ in courts

A fight has begun against a justice system which some deaf people regard as denying them basic human rights.
1990
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: December 1990 (Vol. 4, No. 4)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
2018
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Report reveals uncertainty of future of deaf education

Serious inadequacies of a deaf education board serving thousands of children are being addressed by senior Ministry of Education officials. The ministry confirmed four complaints had been laid about student safety, staffing and low achievement at Auckland's Kelston Deaf Education Centre.
Stuff
1991
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald

The sounds of silence

Turn the light on, so I can hear what you're saying. It's an old line, but a favourite one among us hearing-impaired people, because it points up how we "hear" with our eyes as surely as blind people "see" with their fingers or their ears.
2007
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Deaf people being left on the outer

A shortage of sign language interpreters means as many as 7700 deaf people are struggling to access services in their communities.
1983
publication – Taonga source: New Zealand Deaf News

NZ Deaf News: October 1983 (Vol. 20, No. 4)

1980
video – Taonga source: Dennis Tod

Sumner School for the Deaf celebrates its centenary (100th)

Members of the Deaf community and their families attend the centenary celebrations at Sumner School for the Deaf.
Dennis Tod
2017
video – Taonga source: AUT Sign Language Section

Deaf Health Stories in NZSL

This project explores the experiences of Deaf New Zealanders in accessing healthcare and health information. 40 Deaf people from around New Zealand share their stories about barriers in this setting as well as strategies they have used in advocating for their right to access information, communication, and make informed decisions.
AUT Sign Language Section
2016
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Parenting with Sign Language

We’re alongside Sarah who is Deaf and preparing to give birth to her first child. Having been there twice before, Deaf parents Victoria and Greg, are on hand for advice.
Attitude Pictures
2008
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Nirvana teaching Sign Language

She’s a great mum and teacher and she’s deaf. Nirvana Graham is creating history by teaching our third official language in mainstream school.
Attitude Pictures
1985
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Desperate need in N.Z. for interpreters

Qualified interpreters are desperately needed to cope with the needs of deaf people in New Zealand.
1985
video – Taonga source: Victoria University of Wellington

First interpreting course graduation – 1985

The Sign Language Interpreting course graduation ceremony September 1985, after 14 weeks training.
Victoria University of Wellington
1987-91
video – Taonga source: Susan Thomas

News Review – Montage

A collection of clips from the ‘News Review’ programme 1987-1991.
Susan Thomas
2019
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Using sign language as a family

The Fergusons are an average family of five who have fun, sometimes fight but mostly get along. The main difference is that three of them are deaf, and NZSL is the first language for the whole family. How does this work in a busy household with two teens and a toddler? We spend a few days with the Fergusons and discover it works remarkably well. Especially for the eldest Zoe who is exploring advocating for New Zealand deaf youth.
Attitude Pictures
1990
video – Taonga source: Deaf Aotearoa

Opening of the Bruce McHattie House

The ceremony and speeches to open McHattie House, used as the national office for NZAD.
Deaf Aotearoa
1989
article – Taonga source: The Evening Post

Games for deaf demonstrate need

The New Zealand Deaf Sports Association demonstrated in Wellington at the weekend – at its 33rd annual games – how well it would use the Government funds it is hoping for so the association can hire its own interpreters.
2004
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

The experiences of Māori Deaf

This segment from Māori TV’s Te Hēteri focuses on the experiences of Māori Deaf, catching up with Patrick Thompson, Whiti Ronaki, and Hemi Hema.
Rūaumoko Komiti
1992
article – Taonga source: Western Leader

Curry case highlights Deaf plight

A television documentary on the plight of a deaf man has spurred the Glen Eden-based New Zealand Association of the Deaf into action. It wants to see the man, wrongly imprisoned for two years, receive compensation for his ordeal.
1982
article – Taonga source: NZ Woman’s Weekly

Pat’s deafness helps others

The new field officer for the deaf, Pat says “…deaf people are not morons.”
1990
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Inquiry into Curry murder prosecution

The Police Complaints Authority started an inquiry into a murder charge made in 1988 against Ivan Curry, who is profoundly deaf. The weekend screening of a documentary on TVNZ Channel One's 'The Remand of Ivan Curry', had raised concerns about the way the police handled the case.
1992
article – Taonga source: The Dominion

Needs of deaf people given ‘low’ priority

New Zealand Sign Language must be given official recognition as a language or it will die, Deaf Association President Jennifer Brain says.
2005
article – Taonga source: Unknown

First deaf person to serve on jury

Sign language interpreters have made it possible for a deaf Victoria University lecturer to serve on a jury which is believed to be a first for New Zealand.
1992
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: December 1992

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1987
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

‘Spot On’ visits a Deaf basketball training session

The educational TV series ‘Spot On’, visits a Deaf basketball training session to catch up with Royce Flynn and Megan Mansfield, and understand how the sport is played by Deaf athletes, and controlled by a Deaf referee.
Television New Zealand Archive
2000
video – Taonga source: Deaf Aotearoa

Deaf Association of New Zealand 2000

A look at the work of the New Zealand Association of the Deaf, presented by Judy Bailey.
Deaf Aotearoa
1992
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: September 1992

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1984
article – Taonga source: Southern News

Helping deaf to communicate

There is still much lack of understanding among the general public about the needs of deaf people, says Pat Dugdale, field officer in Wellington for the New Zealand Association of the Deaf.
2016
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: March 2016

Oticon Foundation
1985
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald

Good sign for the deaf

A course to train professional interpreters for the deaf, now being run in Auckland, is the first of its kind in New Zealand.
1995
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: December 1995

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1988
article – Taonga source: Capital Times

Deaf society celebrates anniversary

Wellington Deaf Society secretary, Pat Dugdale, is expecting 200 people from around New Zealand to take part in its 50th anniversary celebrations.
1992
article – Taonga source: Sunday Times

Ivan’s story perfectly told

A review of 'The Remand of Ivan Curry', a docudrama about the deaf man held on remand for 2 years accused of murdering his nephew.
2011
article – Taonga source: Timaru Herald

Deaf call for more interpreters

Christchurch's devastating earthquakes changed the lives of many people. Timaru couple Julie Nielson and Paul O'Donnell could finally turn off their television subtitles thanks to the sign language interpreters who stood beside Christchurch mayor Bob Parker as he addressed the public on a daily basis.
Timaru Herald
1986
article – Taonga source: Zealandia

A capital reception

An interpreter passes on the Pope's message to the deaf during the outdoor Mass at Athletic Park.
1992
article – Taonga source: The Evening Post

Police complain to TVNZ about Curry documentary

The Ivan Curry documentary has prompted the deaf community to insist that professional sign language interpreters be used in all police and court work in future.
1997
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: Winter 1997

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
2019
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Deaf children need better access to New Zealand Sign Language to close the education gap

Lack of access to interpreters means deaf children are missing out on education. There are about 3600 children in the deaf education system, of which about 96 per cent attend mainstream schools. There are just three NZSL educational interpreters working full time with students, meaning most children were missing out.
Stuff
2004
video – Taonga source: Rūaumoko Komiti

Patrick Thompson’s ‘Te Hēteri’ interview – unedited footage

Unedited footage of Patrick Thompson’s ‘Te Hēteri’ interview at the famed Star Sign Cafe on Auckland’s Dominion Road in 2004.
Rūaumoko Komiti
1996
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: March 1996

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1985
publication – Taonga source: New Zealand Deaf News

NZ Deaf News: Spring 1985 (Vol. 22, No. 2)

1991
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

Māori Deaf and Deaf education

A look at the cultural education needs of Māori Deaf students. Māori Deaf are likely to experience more barriers in the education sector. Interviews undertaken by ‘Marae’ shows us that the multiple cultural identities of Māori Deaf are not completely accommodated for with aspirations on how to resolve this.
Television New Zealand Archive
1985
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Ready to lend helping hands to deaf

The class of eight graduates tonight after four months' study learning the variety of sign language used by New Zealand deaf people.
1990-91
publication – Taonga source: New Zealand Deaf News

NZ Deaf News: Spring/Summer 1990/91 (Vol. 24. No. 2)

1989
article – Taonga source: The Press

Interpreters spent year on training

Nearly 90 Christchurch people have spent the last year training to be interpreters at the World Games for the Deaf, with about 50 deaf people teaching the volunteers their language.
1982
article – Taonga source: The Dominion

Interpreter service for deaf urged

One of the New Zealand Association for the Deaf’s priorities is to get interpreters for the profoundly deaf. This was the message in a speech from Mrs Pat Dugdale.
1989
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Deaf easily skirt language hurdle

Deaf people can communicate country to country with more ease than those who can speak. It is not because they have an international sign language – each country has its own – but because it is a visual language.
1989
publication – Taonga source: New Zealand Deaf News

NZ Deaf News: Autumn 1989 (Vol. 23. No. 1)

1994
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: October 1994

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1992
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

NZSL interpreting course begins

The first NZSL interpreting course has recently started in Auckland, being led by Drs. David and Rachel McKee. We take a peek at one of their NZSL classes, and Rachel predicts the areas of work graduates will go into.
Television New Zealand Archive
1994
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

NZ gets 8 more NZSL interpreters from the first AIT Diploma class

The first graduates of the Diploma in NZSL Interpreting course will start working in the community, enabling Deaf people to achieve their rights to access a range of settings and services.
Television New Zealand Archive
1989
publication – Taonga source: New Zealand Deaf News

New Zealand Deaf News: Winter 1989 (Vol. 23. No. 2)

2015
video – Taonga source: Auckland Deaf Society

History through Young Eyes: Interview with Jeff Went

Jeff Went talks about his involvement with Deaf sports and the 1989 World Deaf Games in Christchurch where he volunteered as an ‘international interpreter’ doing 12 hour days over 12 days!
Auckland Deaf Society
1980
publication – Taonga source: New Zealand Deaf News

NZ Deaf News: December 1980 (Vol. 17, No. 6)

1997
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: Autumn 1997

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1992
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald

Treatment of deaf man is modern horror story

The documentary 'The Remand of Ivan Curry (One, Sunday 9.35) was the story of how a man could spend two years in a New Zealand prison without trial. A deaf man arrested for a murder he did not commit who was kept in jail through lack of police investigation then turned back onto the streets with nothing, not even an apology.
1989
article – Taonga source: The Dominion

Board of trustees accepts extra challenges at school for deaf

Board member Ava Buzzard, who has been deaf since birth, is excited by the chance to have a greater role in a school she has been involved with for many years.
1995
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald

Signs from the silent world

Deaf students have the right to equal access to tertiary education but who will pay for sign language interpreters?
1985
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

First sign language interpreting course

An insight into the teaching and learning of those involved in the first sign language interpreting course in New Zealand 1985.
Television New Zealand Archive
2014
video – Taonga source: Deaf Studies Research Unit, VUW

Christchurch Earthquakes: The Deaf Experience

Deaf people share stories in NZSL of their experiences through the 2010 and 2011 Christchurch earthquakes.
Deaf Studies Research Unit, VUW
1983
publication – Taonga source: New Zealand Deaf News

NZ Deaf News: January 1983 (Vol. 20, No. 1)

1983
video – Taonga source: Dulcie McKie

News Review – Deaf Student on Holiday

News Review features Stephen Leach, an Auckland Deaf student studying at Gallaudet College (now Gallaudet University).
Dulcie McKie
1993
article – Taonga source: The Evening Post

Ivan Curry case has positive spinoff

Some good has resulted from the tragic case of deaf man Ivan Curry who was found not guilty after nearly two years in jail for murder, says the Deaf Association.
2005
video – Taonga source: AUT Visual Languages Section

Toa Anga Whati Māori

Māori TV's 'Toa Anga Whati Māori' profiles the Deaf Association of New Zealand on its weekly program, interviewing a series of Deaf people in sports (golf, touch rugby, rugby) before touching upon the job of a Deaf Awareness Officer who delivers training throughout New Zealand.
AUT Visual Languages Section
1986
publication – Taonga source: New Zealand Deaf News

NZ Deaf News: Winter 1986 (Vol. 22. No. 4)

1992
article – Taonga source: The Evening Post

State needs to protect defendant’s right to a fair trial

Curry, who was deaf after suffering meningitis as an infant, spent two years in jail before being brought to trial on a murder charge a jury took just two hours to throw out.
2001
video – Taonga source: Lorraine Butler

Deaf Diversity – Queer Nation

Queer Nation meets a sporty lesbian with nimble fingers. Lorraine talks about her identity, involvement with Deaf sports, performing and access, emphasising that Deaf people are really no different from hearing people.
Lorraine Butler
1999
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: Winter 1999

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
2021
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald.

Deaf Northlander Eddie Hokianga urges Māori to turn their hand towards trilingual interpreter roles

Northland sign language tutor Eddie Hokianga has taken up the task of ensuring the region's deaf Māori community is heard. Hokianga (Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngā Puhi, Ngāti Porou) has spent the last three years teaching te reo sign language to help fill a national void of interpreters fluent in the discourse.
NZ Herald.
1993
video – Taonga source: Deaf Aotearoa

Opening of Deaf Association’s new premises in New Lynn, Auckland

The opening of the Deaf Association National Office and the Auckland Branch Office at the Ceramic House in Totara Avenue, New Lynn on 18 June 1993.
Deaf Aotearoa
2011
article – Taonga source: Capital Times

A sign of communication

It's one of NZ's official languages yet still a mystery to most of us; the sign language used by the Deaf community. As part of Deaf Awareness Week, we asked Kerry Locker-Lampson about being an interpreter.