1985
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Desperate need in N.Z. for interpreters

Qualified interpreters are desperately needed to cope with the needs of deaf people in New Zealand.
1994
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

NZ gets 8 more NZSL interpreters from the first AIT Diploma class

The first graduates of the Diploma in NZSL Interpreting course will start working in the community, enabling Deaf people to achieve their rights to access a range of settings and services.
Television New Zealand Archive
1985
video – Taonga source: Victoria University of Wellington

First interpreting course graduation – 1985

The Sign Language Interpreting course graduation ceremony September 1985, after 14 weeks training.
Victoria University of Wellington
1997
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald

Art of surviving in silence

An interview with Abbie Twiss on World Deaf Awareness Day, and the start of New Zealand's National Deaf Awareness Week. Here, Abbie looks out from her Elam studio. "My thoughts go much faster than I can write." 
1992
article – Taonga source: The Dominion

Needs of deaf people given ‘low’ priority

New Zealand Sign Language must be given official recognition as a language or it will die, Deaf Association President Jennifer Brain says.
2001
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Loud and clear

The deaf community believes it has been misunderstood and misinterpreted for too long. Now it wants to be seen and heard as a group with its own cultural identity.
2007
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Deaf people being left on the outer

A shortage of sign language interpreters means as many as 7700 deaf people are struggling to access services in their communities.
1985
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald

Good sign for the deaf

A course to train professional interpreters for the deaf, now being run in Auckland, is the first of its kind in New Zealand.
1991
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald

The sounds of silence

Turn the light on, so I can hear what you're saying. It's an old line, but a favourite one among us hearing-impaired people, because it points up how we "hear" with our eyes as surely as blind people "see" with their fingers or their ears.
1985
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

First sign language interpreting course

An insight into the teaching and learning of those involved in the first sign language interpreting course in New Zealand 1985.
Television New Zealand Archive
1995
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald

Signs from the silent world

Deaf students have the right to equal access to tertiary education but who will pay for sign language interpreters?
1997
video – Taonga source: Television New Zealand Archive

A korero with Riwia Fox, Māori NZSL interpreter

Riwia Fox, an interpreter is interviewed about her work as a trilingual interpreter. At that time, Riwia was one of only two qualified NZSL interpreters in New Zealand who are Māori, with the other being Stephanie Awheto.
Television New Zealand Archive