2000
video – Taonga source: Deaf Aotearoa

Inside Out: The Art of Signing

Inside Out produces a programme about New Zealand Sign Language, its value to the Deaf community as well as its artistic forms.
Deaf Aotearoa
2001
article – Taonga source: Unknown

Loud and clear

The deaf community believes it has been misunderstood and misinterpreted for too long. Now it wants to be seen and heard as a group with its own cultural identity.
2014
video – Taonga source: Ministry of Education

Acknowledgements – Ko Wai Au? Who Am I? See My Voice?

An acknowledgement to all the team who helped make the Ko Wai Au? Who Am I? See My Voice? exhibition possible. Ko Wai Au is an exhibition empowering Māori rangatahi who identify as Deaf to communicate with others leading to a wider understanding of aspirations as young Deaf Māori.
Ministry of Education
2010
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

The Berry Family: Part 1

We take you into the home of the Berrys and look at the lives of deaf New Zealanders.
Attitude Pictures
2023
video – Taonga source: Speak Up Kōrerotia

Speak Up Kōrerotia – Deaf Education in Aotearoa

This special NZSL Week show looks at the history and progression of deaf education in Aotearoa over time, from the oral method of communication taught for decades to the current use and teaching of NZSL. We interview Kay Drew (former teacher at the Van Asch Deaf Education Centre in Christchurch, and a CODA - child of deaf adults) and Sara Pivac Alexander (Te Herenga Waka Victoria University)
Speak Up Kōrerotia
2006
article – Taonga source: The Dominion

Good signs

The Wellington Association for Deaf Children camp at the Silverstream Retreat at the weekend let families immerse themselves in "deaf culture".
2010
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

The Berry Family: Part 2

We take you into the home of the Berrys and look at the lives of deaf New Zealanders. Playing poker is one of this family’s favourite pastimes!
Attitude Pictures
1992
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: June 1992

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
2023
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Future leaders of Deaf community share vision for NZ Sign Language

While NZSL Week runs from May 8-14, young leaders of the Deaf community are continuously advocating for their culture and language in the hearing world every other week of the year.
Stuff
2009
article – Taonga source: Manawatū Standard.

Scott on mission to learn more

Palmerston North's Annette Scott is hoping to learn how to involve more deaf people in sport when she goes to the Deaflympics in Taiwan next week. Scott is going as New Zealand's Chef de Mission in a 13-strong tour party, which includes six athletes.
Manawatū Standard.
1989
video – Taonga source: Dorothy Jones

Deaf Kiwis abroad!

Deaf New Zealanders take timeout for some sightseeing during a trip to the first, week-long Deaf Way conference in 1989 in Washington DC, USA.
Dorothy Jones
2011
video – Taonga source: Jared Flitcroft

Our Second Home: Wellington Deaf Club

The Wellington Deaf Club is a place where Deaf and hearing alike go to relax, take a break from the ‘outside’ world and communicate in a language that is loud. Jared Flitcroft explores why the Deaf Club is their second home and the cultural aspect of being Deaf in a ‘hearing’ world.
Jared Flitcroft
2002
article – Taonga source: The Evening Post

In full voice

This fascinating book provides insight into a community about which most people are unaware. This is the world of Deaf culture, of Deaf as an identity, not a disability or deficit – Deaf with a capital D.
1990
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: June 1990 (Vol. 4, No. 2)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
2014
video – Taonga source: Ministry of Education

Ko Wai Au? Who Am I? See My Voice?

A video with six rangatahi communicating their stories of being young Turi Māori (Māori Deaf). The topics they discuss include recognition and acknowledgement of Deaf people in the past, Dame Whina Cooper and the impact of Kelston Deaf Education Centre.
Ministry of Education
1992
video – Taonga source: Point of View Productions

‘See What I Mean’

'See What I Mean' presents two real-life stories: the story of a family who were all born Deaf, and a journalist who loses her hearing. It offers positive advice about hearing loss as well as celebrating the New Zealand Deaf community.
Point of View Productions
2023
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Meredith Karim can listen and speak, but she thinks in sign language

Meredith Karim​ was just five months old when she started using NZSL to communicate. She was born a hearing child to deaf parents, often known by the acronym CODA. She says while most people have a voice talking in their heads expressing their thoughts, she visualises hers in NZSL.
Stuff
2019
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Using sign language as a family

The Fergusons are an average family of five who have fun, sometimes fight but mostly get along. The main difference is that three of them are deaf, and NZSL is the first language for the whole family. How does this work in a busy household with two teens and a toddler? We spend a few days with the Fergusons and discover it works remarkably well. Especially for the eldest Zoe who is exploring advocating for New Zealand deaf youth.
Attitude Pictures
1989
article – Taonga source: Christchurch Star

Games ideal world

To most of the athletes attending the sixteenth World Games for the Deaf the social side of the event is as important as the competition. For the 10 days of the games the athletes and deaf officials are living in their ideal world – using their form of communication.
2019
video – Taonga source: Merge NZ

Interview: Jamie Brown from Merge NZ talks about the impacts and benefits of learning NZSL

Jaime Brown, Merge NZ Co-Director, learned NZSL and didn't just find a language, but a community and a passion. Seecus talks to Jaime about the impacts NZSL has had for her and the benefits of learning sign language.
Merge NZ
1992
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: September 1992

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1993
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: September 1993

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
2019
video – Taonga source: Merge NZ

Interview: Victoria Lessing from Merge NZ talks about learning NZSL and its benefits

Victoria Lessing, Merge NZ Co-Director, talks with Seecus about learning NZSL and its benefits.
Merge NZ
1990
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: March 1990 (Vol. 4, No. 1)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1992
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: March 1992

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1991
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald

The sounds of silence

Turn the light on, so I can hear what you're saying. It's an old line, but a favourite one among us hearing-impaired people, because it points up how we "hear" with our eyes as surely as blind people "see" with their fingers or their ears.
2006
video – Taonga source: Handmade Productions Aotearoa

Sign of the Times: The Story of New Zealand’s Visual Language

In April 2006, New Zealand Parliament declared NZSL to be an official language - the culmination of a 20-year battle by the deaf community, and a true hallmark in the recognition of their native language. 'Sign of the Times' is about the deaf New Zealanders who fought to have their language recognised as a real language and as a viable means of communication. The film documents the community's celebration of the official recognition of their language and looks at the community's ongoing hopes and aspirations for their language and culture.
Handmade Productions Aotearoa
2006
article – Taonga source: Unknown

NZ sign language becomes official

The room is full of waving hands and exaggerated facial gestures. Even though the room is silent the dozen women are "talking" with each other just as volubly as if they were having a chinwag. It is a women's only class in New Zealand's latest offical language - NZSL.
1990
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Journal: December 1990 (Vol. 4, No. 4)

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing
1999
publication – Taonga source: National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

NFD Communicate: Winter 1999

National Foundation for Deaf and Hard of Hearing