2016
article – Taonga source: Manawatū Standard

Teaching the deaf since 1973

Teaching for almost 50 years has proved a rewarding career for Terry O'Brien, who has witnessed the development of deaf education. He has seen the transition of deaf education from an emphasis on teaching verbally and through text, to an emphasis on Signed English then NZSL in the 90s.
2011
publication – Taonga source: St Dominic’s Catholic Deaf Centre

Deaf Southern Star: 2011 (Vol. 33, No. 4)

St Dominic’s Catholic Deaf Centre
2017
article – Taonga source: Western Leader.

Growing up CODA

Jack and Oliver Leach switch between two languages. Their parents Monica and Stephen Leach are both deaf. "It's awesome because we can be really loud," Oliver said. The brothers who can hear, had grown up as CODA - or Children of Deaf Adults.
Western Leader.
2016
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Deaf Auckland University student left alone during fire drill

A deaf student has been left feeling hurt after he was cast aside and forgotten about following a fire drill in a university building. Had it been a proper fire emergency, he would have been in serious danger, he said and wanted to see strobe light alarms installed.
Stuff
2018
video – Taonga source: Darryl Alexander

The Making of an NZSL Friendly School

The Making of a NZSL Friendly School follows Andre, who began as a new entrant at the school in 2016, and the journey of his teachers, classmates and wider school community in learning NZSL and incorporating it into school curriculum.
Darryl Alexander
2019
article – Taonga source: Manawatū Standard.

Deaf woman helps others learn sign language over a pint

Candice David was only 3 when she lost her hearing. Now, she's helping others learn her only form of communication, NZSL. Candice was at Palmerston North bar Brew Union on Sunday, offering free NZSL tutorials to all patrons.
Manawatū Standard.
2019
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Using sign language as a family

The Fergusons are an average family of five who have fun, sometimes fight but mostly get along. The main difference is that three of them are deaf, and NZSL is the first language for the whole family. How does this work in a busy household with two teens and a toddler? We spend a few days with the Fergusons and discover it works remarkably well. Especially for the eldest Zoe who is exploring advocating for New Zealand deaf youth.
Attitude Pictures
2019
video – Taonga source: Merge NZ

After decades of crusading for NZ’s deaf community, Auckland woman honoured as ‘local hero’

The New Zealander of the Year will be announced tonight and as part of it, a number of local heroes have been recognised. One of them is Aucklander Victoria Lessing, who has been deaf her whole life and has spent 20 years raising the profile of NZSL. Two years ago, her passion developed into a company called Merge NZ, which she runs alongside her business partner, Jaime Brown.
Merge NZ
2015
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: February 2015

Oticon Foundation
2014
article – Taonga source: The Wellingtonian

A modern tale of two deaf children

Deaf pupil Rahui Lee, 11, leads the year 7 and 8 class in a sign language game of mastermind, in which pupils have to guess a mystery four-digit number by signing.
2017
video – Taonga source: AUT Sign Language Section

Deaf Health Stories in NZSL

This project explores the experiences of Deaf New Zealanders in accessing healthcare and health information. 40 Deaf people from around New Zealand share their stories about barriers in this setting as well as strategies they have used in advocating for their right to access information, communication, and make informed decisions.
AUT Sign Language Section
2013
article – Taonga source: Kōkiri Magazine

Māori Deaf Gather

Last year on Queen’s Birthday weekend, Hamilton man Hemi Hema was honoured for his tireless work advocating for opportunities for Māori Deaf. This Queen’s Birthday weekend he was showing that his great work continues – facilitating a hui for Māori Deaf from throughout Aotearoa aimed at focusing on new beginnings for their community.
Kōkiri Magazine
2016
video – Taonga source: Seek the World

Mingling with locals at Auckland Deaf Club

Two visitors from America (Seek the World and Motion Savvy) gives a short presentation at Auckland Deaf Society on a tablet app that understands sign language. Calvin Young gives a brief tour of the Deaf Club and chats with its President, John Schischka.
Seek the World
2013
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Fire drill at Auckland University an ‘opportunity’ for deaf students

Auckland University's fire drill on Monday left a deaf student feeling forgotten, but could be an opportunity for change, advocates say. Profoundly deaf psychology student Dean Buckley, 21, didn't know about the evacuation until he saw a fire warden yelling at him, minutes after everyone else in his building had fled outside.
Stuff
2017
article – Taonga source: Western Leader.

Milestone in deaf education

A multimillion dollar education centre is helping deaf students communicate. More than 400 people attended the opening of the Kelston Deaf Education Centre (KDEC) rebuild on February 28, 2017.
Western Leader.
2013
publication – Taonga source: Wellington Deaf Society

Absolutely Positively Windy Deaf: September 2013

Wellington Deaf Society
2015
publication – Taonga source: Wellington Deaf Society

Absolutely Positively Windy Deaf: June 2015

Wellington Deaf Society
2018
publication – Taonga source: St Dominic’s Catholic Deaf Centre

Deaf Southern Star: 2018 (Vol. 40, No. 1)

St Dominic’s Catholic Deaf Centre
2010
article – Taonga source: Manawatū Standard

Sign language ‘necessity not choice’

Six months after deaf and hearing-impaired children in the region lost their deaf tutor, problems with the teaching of NZSL continue. "NZSL is not a choice, it's a necessity and we have to give these kids a voice," mother Charmaine Strickland said.
2015
publication – Taonga source: Wellington Deaf Society

Absolutely Positively Windy Deaf: May 2015

Wellington Deaf Society
2017
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Bringing te reo to deaf Māori

Māori concepts like tikanga, iwi and kaumātua don't exist in English-based sign language. And it means deaf Māori have been deprived of their culture, Hamilton-based interpreter Stephanie Awheto said. But that's changing, albeit slowly.
Stuff
2014
video – Taonga source: Ministry of Education

National Deaf Youth Hui 2014

In August 2014, the Ministry of Education brought Deaf students together from across New Zealand for a weekend of ideas, learning and friendship. The Ministry called the hui to better understand what school is really like for Deaf students and to gather their ideas on how things could be improved. This video captures the workshops, fun activities and growing friendships that happened over the weekend.
Ministry of Education
2014
publication – Taonga source: Wellington Deaf Society

Absolutely Positively Windy Deaf: September 2014

Wellington Deaf Society
2017
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Sisters set up deaf cooking class to help deaf people with mental health issues

Two Auckland sisters are helping deaf people living in isolation connect with others through a cooking class. Yolanda Sutton began the cooking class with her deaf sister Natasha Jumelet after they formed the Deaf Wellbeing Society.
Stuff
2013
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: March 2013

Oticon Foundation
2018
video – Taonga source: Deaf Children New Zealand

NZSL and Us: Jorja Steele, Christchurch

Jorja loves to interact with Deaf students at her age and is a keen surfer. She uses NZSL at home and with both her Deaf and hearing peers. She attends a regular school, but it doesn’t stop her from being able to mingle with Deaf girls at age. Her mother is determined to allow Jorja to have the best of both worlds – Deaf and hearing.
Deaf Children New Zealand
2010
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

The Value of Art

Abbie Twiss is curating Auckland’s first exhibition of deaf artists. She talks about the value of art and how being deaf influences her art.
Attitude Pictures
2014
video – Taonga source: Ministry of Education

Acknowledgements – Ko Wai Au? Who Am I? See My Voice?

An acknowledgement to all the team who helped make the Ko Wai Au? Who Am I? See My Voice? exhibition possible. Ko Wai Au is an exhibition empowering Māori rangatahi who identify as Deaf to communicate with others leading to a wider understanding of aspirations as young Deaf Māori.
Ministry of Education
2011
video – Taonga source: Deaf Aotearoa New Zealand

God Defend New Zealand: New Zealand National Anthem in NZSL, Maori & English

In NZSL with subtitles in Māori and English; created in collaboration with native speakers of NZSL, Māori & English, and sign language linguists from the Deaf community, with the purpose to create a NZSL translation that was true to the meaning behind the Māori & English lyrics.
Deaf Aotearoa New Zealand
2013
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Young and Deaf: Dean’s Story

Dean Buckley is a young Deaf man on a mission. Only eighteen years old, Dean's already experienced a great deal of adversity, and now he's determined to become a leader and advocate for other Deaf teenagers. First up, taking on the challenges of Youth Parliament, representing Deaf MP Mojo Mathers.
Attitude Pictures
2011
article – Taonga source: Timaru Herald

Deaf call for more interpreters

Christchurch's devastating earthquakes changed the lives of many people. Timaru couple Julie Nielson and Paul O'Donnell could finally turn off their television subtitles thanks to the sign language interpreters who stood beside Christchurch mayor Bob Parker as he addressed the public on a daily basis.
Timaru Herald
2017
article – Taonga source: Stuff

St Theresa’s School sets example for NZSL friendly schools

A Porirua school is being heralded as a great example of inclusive education. St Theresa's School in Plimmerton is the focus of a new short documentary by van Asch Deaf Education Centre, which will be used as a resource to show how to effectively integrate deaf education and culture into schools.
Stuff
2017
video – Taonga source: Meghan Coppage

Memories of Susan Hamilton

Susan Hamilton is interviewed by Meghan Coppage, where she recounts a range of experiences from her life. From growing up at a Deaf school, to her memories of time in the Deaf community in bygone days, to seeing the changes at Kelston Deaf Education Centre including the transition to new school building.
Meghan Coppage
2016
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

The Deaf Rugby Team: Part One

The first of a three-part series about the Marlins; a group of rugby mad Kiwi blokes who all happen to be Deaf.
Attitude Pictures
2016
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

The Deaf Rugby Team: Part Three – Finale

The final instalment of Attitude’s three-part series with Auckland’s Deaf rugby side, the Marlins. We've followed the guys on and off the field, now we're at the biggest rugby game of the season: it's time to contest the coveted National Shield.
Attitude Pictures
2018
video – Taonga source: Deaf Aotearoa New Zealand

Tiki Taane: No Place Like Home in NZSL

A sign-singing version of Bay of Plenty musician Tiki Taane's song ‘No Place Like Home' featured on television and online to mark NZSL Week 2018. It was made from flash mob events held in Wellington, Mount Maunganui and Christchurch in March. Participants in Mount Maunganui joined Tiki in person to sign-sing his latest song.
Deaf Aotearoa New Zealand
2016
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: March 2016

Oticon Foundation
2015
article – Taonga source: The Wellingtonian

Sign language menu tests guests

CQ Restaurant in Cuba St has launched a NZSL menu where guests sign to order their meal. Talia Carlisle tests her knowledge during NZSL Week.
2019
article – Taonga source: The Northern Advocate

New Year Honours: Whangārei’s Kim Robinson, MNZM, deaf community advocate

A trip to the United States in 1990 gave Whangārei man Kim Robinson extra motivation to seek better and equal access for the deaf community in New Zealand. Now, that commitment to ensuring deaf people are heard and their needs met has seen him made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit (MNZM) for services to the deaf community in the New Year's Honours List.
The Northern Advocate
2019
article – Taonga source: Stuff

New Zealand’s two deaf education centres to merge

New Zealand's two deaf education centres will become one next year as Kelston Deaf Education Centre and van Asch Deaf Education Centre merge from Term 3, 2020.
Stuff
2019
video – Taonga source: Merge NZ

Interview: Victoria Lessing from Merge NZ talks about learning NZSL and its benefits

Victoria Lessing, Merge NZ Co-Director, talks with Seecus about learning NZSL and its benefits.
Merge NZ
2016
article – Taonga source: The Press.

Deaf chef Kristofer Jonsson encourages others to break through barriers

Kristofer Jonsson is a calm and quiet chef, never yelling at anyone in the kitchen, and for good reason – he's deaf. "I focus on the visual side – you can look at the colour, where things are browning."
The Press.
2016
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Deaf and Blind: Being Me Heather

Fifty-nine-year-old Heather Lawson is deaf and blind. She's been through periods of extreme loneliness and isolation, but by becoming independent through orientation and mobility training has helped her to be heard in a world she once felt she wasn’t part of.
Attitude Pictures
2018
video – Taonga source: Deaf Children New Zealand

NZSL and Us: Diamond Johnson, Hamilton

Diamond is a bubbly and active little girl who loves a challenge. Her whānau embraces all three of New Zealand’s languages: English, Te Reo Māori and NZSL. Her mother is determined to improve her NZSL by attending sign language classes so she that she will be able to communicate with Diamond fully as she grows up. Her whānau has a strong commitment to ensure Diamond is exposed to as much NZSL as possible including access to Deaf role models.
Deaf Children New Zealand
2011
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Special votes win deaf MP a seat

Mojo Mathers' rise to Parliament has been labelled a success not just for the Green Party, but also for the New Zealand deaf community.
Stuff
2016
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

The Deaf Toolbox: Making it on the Marae

At some stage in your life you may find yourself on a marae. We’ve put together some helpful tips in NZSL so you’ll feel right at home!
Attitude Pictures
2017
publication – Taonga source: St Dominic’s Catholic Deaf Centre

Deaf Southern Star: 2017 (Vol. 39, No. 3)

St Dominic’s Catholic Deaf Centre
2017
video – Taonga source: New Zealand Society of Translators and Interpreters

Te Tiriti o Waitangi in New Zealand Sign Language

This resource was created for the Treaty Times Thirty project, an initative by the New Zealand Society of Translators and Interpreters to translate New Zealand’s founding document, Te Tiriti of Waitangi into 30 different languages.
New Zealand Society of Translators and Interpreters
2018
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Report reveals uncertainty of future of deaf education

Serious inadequacies of a deaf education board serving thousands of children are being addressed by senior Ministry of Education officials. The ministry confirmed four complaints had been laid about student safety, staffing and low achievement at Auckland's Kelston Deaf Education Centre.
Stuff
2014
video – Taonga source: Ministry of Education

Ko Wai Au? Who Am I? See My Voice?

A video with six rangatahi communicating their stories of being young Turi Māori (Māori Deaf). The topics they discuss include recognition and acknowledgement of Deaf people in the past, Dame Whina Cooper and the impact of Kelston Deaf Education Centre.
Ministry of Education
2015
video – Taonga source: Auckland Deaf Society

History through Young Eyes: Interview with Ngaire Doherty

Saynab Muse, a Tu Kokiri student interviews Ngaire Doherty, ex-President of Auckland Deaf Society at the Balmoral clubroom.
Auckland Deaf Society
2016
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Accessible Marae – The Reply

A short video promoting an accessible marae funded by the Think Differently campaign, featuring Mita Moses.
Attitude Pictures
2012
article – Taonga source: Manawatū Standard.

Deaf seek warm hall

When Manawatu Deaf Society members meet at their clubrooms in Awapuni, they huddle deep in coats and scarves and gloves. Their 22-year-old hall is icebox cold in winter, and members say the difficulty and expense of heating it keeps older society members at home, away from enjoying the society's sociability and events.
Manawatū Standard.
2017
article – Taonga source: The Northern Advocate

Rugby: Kaikohe’s Mihaka Lemon heading on NZ Deaf Blacks tour

Mihaka Lemon is ready to pull on the black jersey as he heads aboard a plane to England for the first time. The 29-year-old will play for the New Zealand Deaf Blacks on their English tour.
The Northern Advocate
2014
video – Taonga source: Deaf Studies Research Unit, VUW

Christchurch Earthquakes: The Deaf Experience

Deaf people share stories in NZSL of their experiences through the 2010 and 2011 Christchurch earthquakes.
Deaf Studies Research Unit, VUW
2017
article – Taonga source: The Press.

Deaf community was home for Margaret Coutts

An obituary on Margaret Coutts who was "the mother of deaf sports", an active leader and strong positive role-model to younger members of the Deaf community. She was the first female president of the Christchurch Deaf Club, and was awarded a NZ Commemoration Medal for her contributions in 1990.
The Press.
2015
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Marcia: Two Sides Of Me

On the Roller Derby court she's the revered 'Meat Train', but Marcia is starting to lose her hearing. She finds Deafness a scary prospect, yet must face her new identity.
Attitude Pictures
2016
publication – Taonga source: Wellington Deaf Society

Windy Hands: June 2016

Wellington Deaf Society
2012
article – Taonga source: Stuff

New TV assistance for deaf viewers

Deaf and hearing-impaired Kiwis are about to get a lot more choice in what they watch on television thanks to closed captioning being introduced on 10 new channels.
Stuff
2019
article – Taonga source: Nelson Mail.

Alarm at cuts in support services for Nelson deaf community

Members of Nelson's deaf community say cutbacks in support services from Deaf Aotearoa have left them without access to crucial interpreting help, leaving some in vulnerable situations.
Nelson Mail.
2019
video – Taonga source: Merge NZ

The Watercooler: Deaf Youth edition

Deaf Youth in New Zealand sharing experiences and stories from their lives.
Merge NZ
2019
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Deaf children need better access to New Zealand Sign Language to close the education gap

Lack of access to interpreters means deaf children are missing out on education. There are about 3600 children in the deaf education system, of which about 96 per cent attend mainstream schools. There are just three NZSL educational interpreters working full time with students, meaning most children were missing out.
Stuff
2017
article – Taonga source: Hawkes Bay Today

Stories of Hawke’s Bay’s deaf school heard

Among the schooling communities in Hawke's Bay perhaps one of the most unique is the deaf community; many of whom were taught at Napier's Onekawa Deaf Unit. Their stories, heard over the past two years by resource teacher of the deaf Juliet Clarke, have now been compiled into a one-of-a-kind book 'Hearing Aid Bras and Other Stories 1969-2014.'
Hawkes Bay Today
2012
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

My Deaf Parents

Parents and teenagers don't always see eye to eye, but what if they speak a different language? This CODA family, with Deaf parents, is learning how to keep the lines of communication.
Attitude Pictures
2019
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Travelling with sign language

Last week we met the Fergusons, a family of five who communicate using NZSL. Here, we join the Fergusons on their trip of a lifetime attending the World Federation of the Deaf Congress — in Paris.
Attitude Pictures
2013
article – Taonga source: NZ Herald.

Mean thieves drive off in deaf couple’s van

A deaf couple are appealing to the public for help after the family's van was stolen from outside their home. Mita Moses and Kathy Strongman want their vehicle back so they can carry on providing a normal life for their family of four children.
NZ Herald.
2012
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: March 2012

Oticon Foundation
2010
publication – Taonga source: St Dominic’s Catholic Deaf Centre

Deaf Southern Star: 2010 (Vol. 32, No. 3)

St Dominic’s Catholic Deaf Centre
2014
publication – Taonga source: Wellington Deaf Society

Absolutely Positively Windy Deaf: May 2014

Wellington Deaf Society
2014
publication – Taonga source: Oticon Foundation

Soundscape: February 2014

Oticon Foundation
2017
article – Taonga source: The Northern Advocate

Flashing smoke alarm wakes deaf woman, saves life

Mihiarangi Marsters is living proof smoke alarms save lives. The 71-year-old great-great-grandmother escaped as flames engulfed the kitchen of her Tikipunga home. Deaf since the age of 7, it was the special flashing smoke alarm that woke her and allowed her to grab her 4-year-old great- granddaughter and flee before it was too late.
The Northern Advocate
2016
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Deaf Teen’s New School

Gaby Evans is 13 and moving hundreds of kilometres from her rural home to Auckland's Kelston Deaf Education Centre. Until now she's been isolated, and never had to know how to sign. If she's going to make it on her own she's going to have to come out of her shell and learn to communicate with her deaf classmates.
Attitude Pictures
2011
video – Taonga source: Jared Flitcroft

Our Second Home: Wellington Deaf Club

The Wellington Deaf Club is a place where Deaf and hearing alike go to relax, take a break from the ‘outside’ world and communicate in a language that is loud. Jared Flitcroft explores why the Deaf Club is their second home and the cultural aspect of being Deaf in a ‘hearing’ world.
Jared Flitcroft
2016
article – Taonga source: The Northern Advocate

Danger for deaf drives campaign

A Northland advocate is behind a campaign to get deaf-friendly fire alarms installed in public buildings, after a deaf university student was left behind during a drill. Whangarei's Kim Robinson, chairman of Deaf Action New Zealand, is driving the petition to make visual fire alarms - similar to what many deaf people have in their homes - mandatory in public buildings.
The Northern Advocate
2018
article – Taonga source: Southland Times

Marae visit highlights challenges the deaf face in connecting with Māori culture

A visit by a group of Southland students to a marae has highlighted the challenges faced by deaf Māori who want to connect with their culture.
Southland Times
2016
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Parenting with Sign Language

We’re alongside Sarah who is Deaf and preparing to give birth to her first child. Having been there twice before, Deaf parents Victoria and Greg, are on hand for advice.
Attitude Pictures
2018
video – Taonga source: Deaf Children New Zealand

NZSL and Us: Zenos Tamihana, Auckland

Zenos Tamihana comes from a large, loving family that cares deeply about his communication needs. He is a lively, happy young boy who loves sports and attends Kelston Primary School in Auckland. Zenos has a teacher who is Deaf herself and uses NZSL in class. Zenos thrives at home and at school largely thanks to full access to language and communication.
Deaf Children New Zealand
2018
article – Taonga source: Stuff

An ‘inspirational’ deaf teacher is teaching sign language to hearing toddlers

One deaf teacher in south Auckland has inspired several toddlers and their parents to learn sign language.
Stuff
2010
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

The Berry Family: Part 2

We take you into the home of the Berrys and look at the lives of deaf New Zealanders. Playing poker is one of this family’s favourite pastimes!
Attitude Pictures
2018
video – Taonga source: Merge NZ

NZSLTA Hui 2018

The New Zealand Sign Language Teacher's Association Hui in October 2018 was a great weekend of professional development for those that teach, and want to teach NZSL.
Merge NZ
2019
video – Taonga source: Merge NZ

The Watercooler: Deaf Edition

Three Deaf panelists talk about their experiences in communication, schooling, and work. Facilitated by a Deaf MC with interpreted voice over these hilarious, heartwarming experiences give an insight into the Deaf community.
Merge NZ
2011
video – Taonga source: Asia Downunder

I’m Deaf, Let’s Talk

Meet Karishma Mohan, one of the faces of NZSL Week 2011. Here, we get a glimpse of Karishma's life – both home, work and socially. She is studying to become a teacher with a practicum at Kelston Deaf Education Centre's pre-school.
Asia Downunder
2019
video – Taonga source: Merge NZ

Interview: Jamie Brown from Merge NZ talks about the impacts and benefits of learning NZSL

Jaime Brown, Merge NZ Co-Director, learned NZSL and didn't just find a language, but a community and a passion. Seecus talks to Jaime about the impacts NZSL has had for her and the benefits of learning sign language.
Merge NZ
2011
article – Taonga source: Capital Times

A sign of communication

It's one of NZ's official languages yet still a mystery to most of us; the sign language used by the Deaf community. As part of Deaf Awareness Week, we asked Kerry Locker-Lampson about being an interpreter.
2015
video – Taonga source: Auckland Deaf Society

History through Young Eyes: Interview with Owen Gibbons

Former Auckland Deaf Society President and life member, Owen Gibbons says that one of his best memories was travelling to the World Deaf Games as part of the New Zealand Deaf basketball mens team. His eyes “literally popped out at what he saw over there!”
Auckland Deaf Society
2016
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

NZSL has become an integral part of Coffee Educators

Not long after opening Co-Ed Cafe and the associated training school, Claire Matheson began running courses for students of Newlands College Deaf Unit. NZSL is now used in meetings and training, and they have menus in sign language.
Attitude Pictures
2014
article – Taonga source: The Dominion

Fewer Kiwis can use sign language

James Whale can speak as well as any 5-year old but sometimes he lets his hand do the talking. The Wellington boy and his family are among the dwindling number of Kiwis who can use NZSL.
2015
video – Taonga source: Auckland Deaf Society

History through Young Eyes: Interview with Jeff Went

Jeff Went talks about his involvement with Deaf sports and the 1989 World Deaf Games in Christchurch where he volunteered as an ‘international interpreter’ doing 12 hour days over 12 days!
Auckland Deaf Society
2010
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

The Berry Family: Part 1

We take you into the home of the Berrys and look at the lives of deaf New Zealanders.
Attitude Pictures
2016
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Deaf Sport: Playing Deaf Rugby

A compressed version of a three-part series about the Marlins, Auckland’s Deaf rugby team. The guys are followed on and off the field and in the run up to the biggest game of the season.
Attitude Pictures
2012
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

Deaf Politician Mojo Mathers

Mojo Mathers is New Zealand's first Deaf Member of Parliament. She's using her position to advocate on disability, but she's battled her own prejudices.
Attitude Pictures
2016
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

The Deaf Rugby Team: Part Two

Leading into the biggest competition of the year, we get to know more about some of the players in the Marlins, Auckland’s Deaf Rugby team; Opeti the family man, Talia the bodybuilder, Sailusi who wants a job and David who is a first-time dad.
Attitude Pictures
2011
publication – Taonga source: St Dominic’s Catholic Deaf Centre

Deaf Southern Star: 2011 (Vol. 33, No. 2)

St Dominic’s Catholic Deaf Centre
2015
article – Taonga source: Stuff

Uber calls for review of NZTA restrictions on deaf drivers

Government rules restricting deaf and hearing impaired people from driving taxis need reviewing, Uber says. The ride hire app, which connects customers with private drivers, has just released an app with new features designed to help drivers with impaired hearing.
Stuff
2016
article – Taonga source: Hawkes Bay Today

Past pupils to reunite 50th Anniversary of the Onekawa School Deaf Unit

This weekend past and present pupils of Onekawa School will be coming together to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Onekawa School Deaf Unit. From March 22 to March 25, ex-pupils and friends of the Onekawa deaf unit will meet in Hawke's Bay to remember their schooling experiences, share stories and visit the site of the old unit.
Hawkes Bay Today
2015
video – Taonga source: Auckland Deaf Society

History through Young Eyes: Interview with Susie Ovens

A Tu Kokiri student interviews Susie Ovens on her involvement with the infamous Deaf Sign Singers group.
Auckland Deaf Society
2010
video – Taonga source: Attitude Pictures

The Art of Abbie Twiss

Abbie Twiss, a deaf artist talks about expressing her ideas, thoughts and emotions. She says without art, the world would be a dark and very depressing place.
Attitude Pictures